Philadelphia Young Playwrights learning through play writing.

Bartol Blog

Learn what is happening in the field of arts education and teaching artistry. Past blog posts with links to resources can be found by searching or by clicking on a category below. Check in often as we update our blog and link to local and national resources.

“It’s called a micro-grant, but the effects are felt at a macro level” – Interview with Bartol/SBMA Micro-Grantee Yinka Orafidiya

This year, the Bartol Foundation announced a new partnership with Small But Mighty Arts to award micro-grants to teaching artists working on community-based projects. Yinka Orafidiya, a socially engaged ceramic artist, is one of the grantees from our first round of awards last spring. Meet Yinka in our Q&A!

 

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself as a teaching artist?

Honestly, I didn’t start out as a teaching artist. When I started out, I was just strictly making pots. It was something that I gravitated towards because it was calming and therapeutic and a way for me to meditate in a dynamic way, with my hands being in motion but my mind being still. Over time, I started to transition into projects that had a social engagement component to connect with the community through my artwork. And I realized that the best way to do that was through teaching, demonstrating, and encouraging others to work with the material and engage with these objects that I was making. So, that’s how I started to cultivate a teaching practice in conjunction with my artistic practice.

 

What will you be doing with the microgrant you received from SBMA/Bartol?

Earlier this year, I received a fellowship that took me to Ghana to work with female potters. The micro-grant will be used to support the second half of that project, which is to utilize the experiences and lessons from Ghana to transition that into workshops here in Philly. A series of free workshops are going to take place over the course of two weeks, and I’m inviting black women in the area to join me in making handmade pottery vessels. We’re going to do this communally, building these pots together coil by coil. And the participating women don’t have to pay for anything—the micro-grant will enable me to provide them with all the tools, materials, and supplies they need to participate in these workshops.

 

What would you tell other teaching artists and artists working in the community about applying for a microgrant?

It may sound corny, I would say to just do it. The process is pretty straightforward. I know other artists in my peer group who specifically have this grant on their to-do list every year, but they never apply because they don’t think they’re ready. Honestly, when I decided to apply I wasn’t sure what the outcome would be, but I knew that you have to go through the process to prepare yourself for potentially re-applying for the next cycle. Don’t postpone it—do it now.

 

Anything else youd like to add?

I just want to express gratitude and appreciation for this award. It’s called a micro-grant, but the effects are felt at a macro level. It goes beyond just the award amount—it’s also validation for me as an artist, and confirmation that what I’m doing is relevant. Having a reputable organization support my work in this way is really encouraging for me to press forward and be more bold with my ideas and effort.

 

To learn more about Yinka’s work, visit her website or Instagram.

Interview responses have been edited for length and clarity.

“Easy to apply for, easy to use” – Interview with Bartol/SBMA Micro-Grantee Chris Coyle

This year, the Bartol Foundation announced a new partnership with Small But Mighty Arts to award micro-grants to teaching artists working on community-based projects. Chris Coyle is one of five winners from our first round of awards last spring. He is a bassist, composer, and music educator.

Meet Chris in our Q&A!

 

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself as a teaching artist?

I have been teaching music performance, theory, and project-based topics for the last twelve years. In addition to private instruction and classroom teaching at schools and colleges, I have begun to focus on hands-on performance and critical listening workshops and presentations as well. This has led me to design and conduct some unique and fun programming for organizations like Art-Reach and Musicopia, and for art programs that serve adults with disabilities. Much of this is done through a project I started in 2012 called Outside Sound and we’ve been fortunate enough to receive funding through a handful of grants and arts organizations. I bring a wealth of experiences to educational situations – aside from being an active performer (double bass, guitar, percussion), I am a writer (music and text), a traveler, and am active in other mediums/arts aside from music.

 

What will you be doing with the micro-grant you received from SBMA/Bartol?

The micro-grant funds have been used to purchase some new and used gear/instruments and to repair some instruments. All of these items will be used in workshops with school students, with art programs that I partner with, and in Outside Sound activities. The grant has gone a long way in improving the materials that I have at my disposal to work with students and participants in every teaching situation!

 

What would you tell other teaching artists and artists working in the community about applying for a micro-grant?

It is refreshing to find a funding opportunity that is easy to apply for, easy to use, and also brings together other artists and arts administrators in a community setting!

 

Anything else you’d like to add?

Thank you to SBMA! I look forward to sharing specifics about how this grant has impacted upcoming teaching engagements, and I hope to participate in an SBMA event in the near future to talk about my work, approach, and vision for sharing creative music.

Please give me a visit online at www.chriscoylemusbic.com or at www.outsidesound.net

 

Interview responses have been edited for length and clarity.

2018 Bartol Award Announced: Sister Cities Girlchoir

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 18, 2018

CONTACT:

Beth Feldman Brandt

Executive Director

267-519-5311 (office); 610-513-2668 (cell)

bfbrandt@bartol.org

 

STOCKTON RUSH BARTOL FOUNDATION SELECTS SISTER CITIES GIRLCHOIR AS THE RECIPIENT OF THE 2018 GEORGE BARTOL ARTS EDUCATION AWARD

Award Honors Artistic Excellence and Commitment to Community

Philadelphia, PA—The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation has selected Sister Cities Girlchoir (SCG) as the winner of the 2018 George Bartol Arts Education Award. The Award is given to an organization that provides sustained, meaningful exposure and participation in the arts; that demonstrates an active engagement in the lives of its students and community; and that maintains high artistic standards for its faculty and students.

The George Bartol Arts Education Award was established in 2001 to recognize outstanding arts education programs by a non-profit cultural organization. Each year, a grant of $5,000 is made in memory of George Bartol, founder of the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation, who believed that the key to a thriving arts community was an investment in arts education for its children. As part of its annual grant review process, the Foundation designates one grantee to receive this additional award of $5,000 to further support its arts education programs. This year’s award is made possible in part through gifts from Mr. Bartol’s children.

Beth Feldman Brandt, Executive Director of the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation says, “With the vision and energy of its founder, Alysia Lee, Sister Cities Girlchoir is fully committed to helping girls achieve their potential by helping them to literally and figuratively raise their voices.  We are grateful to be able to support such inspiring work.”

“Sister Cities is built on the premise that artists are vital to communities and that every young girl deserves access to all that the arts can teach. We are proud of the teaching artist team at SCG which embodies our mission to share the power of the arts to transform young women into not just artists, but leaders,” said Ms. Lee. “We are grateful to be recognized for this work by the George Bartol Arts Education Award.”

 

About Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation

The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation works at the intersection of arts, education, community and philanthropy, grounded in our belief that deeply meaningful arts experiences strengthen people and communities. The Bartol Foundation advocates for and facilitates partnerships in which cultural organizations, teaching artists, community partners, and funders work toward the common goal of providing high-caliber, equitable arts education to people in Philadelphia, especially those in the most under-resourced or under-served communities. We utilize our knowledge and resources to create to generate more resources and opportunities for all.

 

About Sister Cities Girlchoir

Sister Cities Girlchoir (SCG) empowers girls by building resilience, leadership, mastery and connection through a comprehensive choral training academy that invests in the unique potential of girls to improve our world. The program is research-based, and uses music as a girl empowerment tool.  SCG is modeled on the powerful impact that investments in the lives of girls make for a city block, a neighborhood, a city….for the world.SCG is modeled after El Sistema, Venezuela’s music education program that is transforming lives and communities around the world. SCG Founder, Alysia Lee spent a year studying El Sistema and visiting programs in Venezuela and throughout the U.S. through the Sistema Fellowship at the New England Conservatory.

 

The list of past award winners is available here.

“It shouldn’t be this difficult for artists to thrive” – Interview with Erica Hawthorne-Manon, Founder and Managing Director of Small But Mighty Arts

Photo Credit: www.smallbutmightyarts.org.

 

This past spring, the Bartol Foundation announced a new partnership with Small But Mighty Arts (SBMA) to award ten $500 micro-grants to Philadelphia-based teaching artists. As part of our ongoing Q&A series, we spoke with Erica Hawthorne-Manon, Founder and Managing Director of SBMA, to learn more about her work with the Philadelphia arts community and SBMA’s new partnership with the Bartol Foundation.

SBMA is now accepting applications to award five more micro-grants to teaching artists working on community-based projects. The application will close Sunday, September 9. Access the online application here.

 

Can you tell me a bit about your background in the arts? How did you decide to found Small But Mighty Arts?

I came to Philadelphia as a creative myself. My background is in theatre, writing, and spoken word, which is kind of like a marriage between theatre and poetry. I also have a professional background in public relations and business. I did a lot of “starving artist” things and did my art on the side of my full-time job, even though I wanted to do more. I realized just how challenging it was to be an artist on many different levels, whether it was finding opportunities or being able to expand my skills beyond just performance. I didn’t understand why my peers and I were having such a difficult time—we had talent and skills, but we were always struggling to find the next opportunity. I felt that it shouldn’t be this difficult for artists to thrive, knowing how important the arts are to the community, education, and the creative economy.

Around this same time, a friend suggested I apply for a grant to fund ideas. I pitched three of my ideas, and one was selected—to provide artists with smaller funds during a critical time window. When I was working on my album, I had the experience of being short about $500-1,000 to finish the technical production of the project. I had done the bulk of the work and just needed a little bit of funding so that I wouldn’t have to stop. I pitched this idea to small firms and got awarded a challenge grant, and that’s what brought me to start Small But Mighty Arts.

 

What is most meaningful to you about SBMA’s work in the community?

The ability to make connections, especially connections that turn into real, tangible opportunities. For me, that’s the whole point of SBMA. Even though we started with micro-grant programs, the purpose is to shorten the distance between an artist and their next career-enhancing opportunity, whether that’s professional development, funding, or marketing and promotion.

Our partnerships with other organizations and programs have also been very valuable. We would not be able to thrive without our partnerships. Many of the artists that we fund through micro-grants we’ve also connected to our partner organizations and other paid opportunities. We always think about what it means to be able to share mission and goals when we partner with organizations in a way that’s powerful for both of us. I think the fact that people are willing to partner with us, even though we’re small, continues to help us expand what we’re able to give back to artists.

 

What’s been the most rewarding moment from your work with SBMA?

It changes, but right now it’s getting emails from artists that we’ve worked with or funded and hearing that our work with them led them to another opportunity or kept their momentum going. We got an email from one of our 2017 grantees, Irina Varina, who worked on a film that premiered at a film festival in New York, and part of the micro-grant funding that we gave her allowed her to finish that project. Another grantee from 2017 is Amy Schofield, who’s a flamenco dancer. We were able to book her for a performance at the Barnes Foundation, and then the Barnes reached out and wanted to book her again. It’s those types of moments that are really powerful for me. Sometimes we also hear that an SBMA grant is the first one an artist has received, and that grant gives them inspiration to apply for other opportunities. That’s the whole point—that they don’t give up and they’re able to persist, and we make it possible for artists to do that right here in Philadelphia.

 

SBMA recently partnered with the Bartol Foundation to award micro-grants to teaching artists and to share a staff Artist Engagement Fellow. What drew you to this collaboration with Bartol?

It started with us first supporting each other’s work and sharing information with our networks. We realized that we have very similar missions and goals. We also saw the value in being able to inform our artists, who are not teaching artists, of the opportunity to develop that skill. Bartol was reimagining their focus, and when they reached out to us it made a lot of sense to work together toward a shared mission goal. Through sharing an Artist Engagement Fellow, we’re able to highlight the artists that we’ve funded, and to make sure that there’s shared information between the two organizations about other opportunities for artists.

This partnership has been five years in the making. Not every partnership takes that long, but I will say that our best partnerships have been the ones that we’ve built over time. That’s encouragement to others who are thinking about building partnerships. You are probably already starting by the relationships you are creating. It’s worth building all levels of partnerships—they get very valuable work done for the communities that we serve.

 

Interview responses have been edited for length and clarity.

Announcing the Bartol Foundation’s 2018 Grantees

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 24, 2018

CONTACT:

Beth Feldman Brandt

Executive Director

256-519-5311 (office); 610-513-2668 (cell)

bfbrandt@bartol.org

 

STOCKTON RUSH BARTOL FOUNDATION AWARDS

22 GRANTS TO PHILADELPHIA ARTS AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS

 

Five Micro-grants Also Awarded to Teaching Artists through 

New Partnership with Small But Mighty Arts

 

Philadelphia, PA—The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation announced today that it will distribute $125,000 in grants to 22 Philadelphia arts and cultural organizations. The Foundation supports organizations in a range of artistic disciplines with an emphasis on arts education and community-based arts programs. A complete list with information on each grantee is available here.

In addition, the Foundation approved $2,500 in its first of two rounds of micro-grants. Grants of $500 each were awarded to five individual teaching artists through a new partnership with Small But Mighty Arts (SBMA.) SBMA supports members of the creative community by connecting artists directly with resources and networks. Information on these grantees is available here.

The 2018 roster of grantees reflects the Bartol Foundation’s commitment to supporting cultural organizations that provide exceptional, sustained arts experiences to children, teens and adults throughout Philadelphia’s neighborhoods. The Bartol Foundation supports diverse organizations from large to small, established and emerging. The Foundation made 18 grants of $5,000 each.  Four grants of $7,500 each were made to:

  • Sister Cities Girlchoir for their Saturday Girlchoir Academy that builds singers and leaders;
  • PhillyCAM for their development of “people-powered media”;
  • The Tibetan Association of Greater Philadelphia for programs which preserve traditional Tibetan dance, music and song; and,
  • Warrior Writers to bring together veterans and members of the Iraqi community to collaborate.

Three first-time grantees bring new perspectives and audiences to the roster of grantees:

  • ArtSphere for their pre-school program in Philadelphia neighborhoods;
  • Dehkontee Artists Theatre serves the Liberian community with a project that will address issues of domestic and gun violence; and,
  • Power Street Theatre Company, a collective of multicultural and multidisciplinary artists that empowers marginalized artists and communities of color.

“Bartol has a new strategic vision through which we are re-affirming our commitment to organizations which engage and amplify voices that might otherwise be marginalized or silenced,” said Toni Shapiro-Phim, Chair of the Foundation’s Board of Trustees and Director of Programs for the Philadelphia Folklore Project.  “We are also pursuing new partnerships such as our micro-grant program with SBMA that will increase our impact through collaborations.”

“There are many organizations, especially representing communities of color, that have a vibrant cultural life but do not have the same access to resources,” added Beth Feldman Brandt, Executive Director of the Foundation. “We are committed to supporting the organizations and teaching artists who are part of these communities.”

The $5,000 George Bartol Arts Education Award, given annually to an organization that exemplifies the Foundation’s priorities, will be announced in the fall of 2018.

Grants distributed to organizations this year also include $10,000 in funds from Waterman II Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation.

Updated guidelines and applications for the next round of grants will be available in the winter of 2019 on the Foundation’s website at www.bartol.org with an application deadline of May 1, 2019.

The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation works at the intersection of arts, education, community and philanthropy, grounded in our belief that deeply meaningful arts experiences strengthen people and communities. The Bartol Foundation advocates for and facilitates partnerships in which cultural organizations, teaching artists, community partners, and funders work toward the common goal of providing high-caliber, equitable arts education to people in Philadelphia, especially those in the most under-resourced or under-served communities. We utilize our knowledge and resources to create to generate more resources and opportunities for all.

 

Organization Brief project description 2018 Grant
1812 Productions In-school theatre residency program $5,000
Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture General operating support $5,000
Art Sphere Inc. General operating support $5,000
Art-Reach General operating support $5,000
ArtWell General operating support $5,000
Asian Arts Initiative General operating support $5,000
Centro Nueva Creacion After-school Bomba Classes $5,000
Dehkontee Artists Theatre Inc Theatre program based in Liberian community $5,000
Enchantment Theatre Company Theatre Residency at PASchool for the Deaf $5,000
Koresh Dance Company Koresh Kids Dance $5,000
Kulu Mele African Dance & Drum Ensemble General operating support $5,000
Musicopia Musicopia Percussion Network (MPN) $5,000
Philadelphia Folklore Project General operating support $5,000
Philadelphia Photo Arts Center Teen photo program $5,000
Philadelphia Public Access Corp dba PhillyCAM Community Video Training $7,500
Philadelphia Dance Company General operating support $5,000
Philadelphia Young Playwrights Core Program of in-class playwriting residencies $5,000
Power Street Theatre Company Free theatre program for diverse adults. $5,000
Sister Cities Girlchoir Saturday Girlchoir Academy $7,500
Taller Puertorriqueno Arts and cultural education programs $5,000
Tibetan Association Of Philadelphia Tibetan cultural dance and song program $7,500
Warrior Writers of CultureTrust Greater Philadelphia Veterans and Iraqis video project $7,500

FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: Project Stream Grant—Interview with Allison Vanyur, Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance

Photo: People’s Emergency Center, 2016 Project Stream grantee. (Courtesy of Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance)

 

The Philadelphia region offers a wide range of funding opportunities for community-based artists and organizations. One example is Project Stream, a grant administered by the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance. Learn more and get application tips in our Q&A with Allison Vanyur, Grants & Events Manager at the Cultural Alliance.

 

Can you explain a bit of background information about the Project Stream Grant?

Project Stream is a program of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts (PCA), a state government agency. They run a number of different arts funding opportunities, but two of them—Project Stream and Program Stream—are facilitated by regional partner organizations, so this gives the decision-making power to local communities. The Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance facilitates Project Stream in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery, and Philadelphia Counties. This opportunity is open to any individual, nonprofit organization, or fiscally sponsored organization in Pennsylvania. The grants support any type of arts-specific projects, including exhibitions, performances, poetry readings, and art education programs. The maximum amount you can request is $2,500.

 

Do individuals need to have a fiscal sponsor or can anyone apply?

Individuals do not need to have fiscal sponsors. Any individual over the age of 18 who lives in the five-county Philadelphia region can apply. If an organization wants to apply and they do not have 501(c)(3) nonprofit status, then they would need a fiscal sponsor.

 

What impact do you hope that Project Stream will have on Philadelphia’s cultural landscape?

The main goal of Project Stream is to promote access to the arts in every county in Pennsylvania. The PCA distributes Project Stream grants in every county of Pennsylvania. So, our goal is always that the pool of applicants represents the diverse communities that make up the region. Every Project Stream grant must have a public component of some sort—such as an exhibition or something that the public can come to—so that anyone in the community can experience or participate in the project.

I think another thing that makes Project Stream really unique is that it’s open to organizations that don’t necessarily have a specific arts focus. So, a church or a community center that does not typically present arts programming can apply for the same opportunity as a ballet company or a museum.

 

What advice would you give someone applying for the first time?

I think the most important thing to remember when you’re writing a Project Stream application is that these proposals are reviewed by a volunteer panel of your peers. Anyone who lives in the region can volunteer to serve as a panelist, and they all have varying degrees of arts expertise. We really want the stakeholders in the community to have a voice in what is presented in their communities. For this reason, I always tell people to assume that panelists are not familiar with your work, or even with your artistic discipline—to really over-articulate and be very, very clear when you’re describing your project and identifying the goals you hope to reach.

 

How can interested individuals learn more information?

More information can be found on our website, or by emailing me at allisonv@philaculture.org.

 

Interview responses have been edited for length and clarity.

Bartol and Small But Mighty Arts Announce Partnership

The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation today announced a partnership with Small But Mighty Arts of CultureTrust Greater Philadelphia (SBMA) to award ten $500 micro-grants to Philadelphia-based teaching artists.

Small But Mighty Arts is a connector organization that creates career-enhancing opportunities for artists. This micro-grant program is designed to give teaching artists the jumpstart they need to advance or complete a creative project in the community.

“By partnering with Small But Mighty Arts, the Bartol Foundation can amplify our impact and directly support individual artists who are working in communities,” said Beth Feldman Brandt, Executive Director of the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation. “Bartol and SBMA share the same ‘can do’ attitude, and both our strengths lie in our networks and our knowledge of the communities we serve, as well as our shared belief that small can be powerful.”

“Ultimately artists win when we partner. By cross-promoting, resource-sharing, and collaborating based on each of organizations’ programmatic strengths, we’re able to shorten the distance between artists and the opportunities that will help them to thrive,” says Erica Hawthorne-Manon, Executive Director of Small But Mighty Arts. As a ‘small but mighty’ organization in an ever-changing non-profit landscape, partnerships are also critical to our sustainability.”

Both Feldman Brandt and Hawthorne-Manon are pleased to be modeling a partnership program, something they and other funders often suggest to the small non-profits they fund.

“As a funder, we often tell our grantees to partner with each other for greater impact,” says Brandt. “Now funders and grantees alike can see how that looks in action. Small But Mighty Arts and Bartol share goals that are aligned and have complimentary resources. We realized we each could benefit from this partnership, as would our grantees.”

Micro-grant guidelines and info session registration will be available the week of March 19, 2018.Applications will be open April 2 – 14, 2018. Grant recipients will be announced the week of May 21, 2018. For more information visit www.smallbutmightyarts.org/sbma-grant.

 

The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation works at the intersection of arts, education, community and philanthropy, grounded in our belief that deeply meaningful arts experiences strengthen people and communities. The Bartol Foundation serves as a hub through which cultural organizations, teaching artists, community partners, and funders work toward the common goal of providing high-caliber, equitable arts education to people in Philadelphia, especially those in the most under-resourced or under-served Through grantmaking, professional development programs and arts advocacy, we utilize our knowledge and resources to create collaborations within and across our own and other networks to generate more resources and opportunities for all.

Small But Mighty Arts of CultureTrust Greater Philadelphia (SBMA) deepens engagement between artists and the community through the facilitation of partnership programs, resource connections, information-sharing, funding, and advising. FOR ARTISTS: SBMA provides artists with the “spark” they need to continue or complete projects, maintain creative momentum, and put more work into the community through connecting & informing artists about career-enhancing opportunities, offering access to funding through micro-grants, and providing a range of advisory services. FOR ORGANIZATIONS: SBMA works with organizations and institutions to help them reach their creative project goals through connection and engagement with emerging and established artists.

8 Tips to a Strong (Bartol) Grant Proposal – Deadline May 1, 2018!

Bartol’s 2018 grant application is officially open online. For more information about the process, visit https://bartol.org/apply-for-grants/.

At the Bartol Foundation, we want to consider your strongest proposal.  After many years and reading many, many proposals, we encourage organizations to use these tips when creating your request.

  1. No Need to Preach to the Choir: At the Bartol Foundation, we understand the importance of arts education, the creative process and community-based programs.  Focus your proposal on your specific needs and goals rather than extensively quoting research on the importance of the arts.
  2. Be Concrete and Specific: We want to invest in programs that are clear in their goals and their implementation.  Provide us with concrete details that show you have the components of your proposal well planned out.  For example, give us a timeline of activities, the date and the venue of a community performance, and/or include a support letter from your partner school. Make sure to provide a sample curriculum as part of the required attachments for an arts education request.
  3. Define your Terms:  What is a “ten-week residency”?  Once a week for ten weeks?  All-day, every day for ten weeks?  Forty-five minute sessions or three-hour sessions?  The same students every time or different?  Twelve students in a class or 200?  Again, be specific.
  4. But what if I don’t know the details?  We understand that sometimes our deadline doesn’t quite mesh with your planning.  In that case, tell us the process that you will use to make important decisions or to identify your prospective partners or artists.  Tell us about your track record with work similar to what you are proposing.  But more details always result in a stronger proposal.  Sometimes the best thing is to wait until next year if your plans are not fully formed yet.
  5. Don’t Cite Partners without Telling Them. We expect that you have spoken with any person or organization that you are naming as a potential partner.  Make sure that they are not also applying to the Foundation for a similar or conflicting request.  It’s always good to provide a letter of support that demonstrates a potential partner is on board.
  6. Evaluation can be simple.  We want to know that you have a system for assessing how you are doing and adapting as you go.  This can be as simple as, “We had no enrollment on Mondays.  We asked the parents and found out that Monday was karate day.  We switched the class to Thursdays and now it’s full.”    In any case, please do answer the question about evaluation with one concrete example.
  7. Why now? We tend to fund about one-half of the proposals we receive.  Often those that receive funding make a compelling case as to why this is something that needs to happen now.  Why does this project or this year’s general operating programs represent an important step for your organization artistically or organizationally?  Many of you have long-range plans.  Tell us (briefly and concretely) how your request will move your plans forward.
  8. You can’t be new and vague. For organizations that are new to us, or just plain new, convince us that you have the capacity to pull off what you are proposing.  Again, do this by being concrete and specific when describing your program.

 

A reminder that you cannot apply to the Foundation without a site visit prior to the deadline. Site visits must be scheduled by April 6, 2018 and must take place by May 1, 2018.

Any questions?  Call or email us.  The lines are open.

info@bartol.org

267-519-5310

Bartol Announces 2017 Arts and Cultural Grants

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 17, 2017

STOCKTON RUSH BARTOL FOUNDATION AWARDS

22 GRANTS TO PHILADELPHIA ARTS AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS

Grants awarded to exemplary cultural organizations highlighting commitment to arts education

Philadelphia, PA—The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation announced today that it will distribute $115,000 in grants to 22 Philadelphia arts and cultural organizations. The Foundation supports organizations in a range of artistic disciplines with an emphasis on arts education and community-based arts programs.  A complete list of grants for 2017 with information on each grantee is available here.

The 2017 roster of grantees reflects the Bartol Foundation’s commitment to supporting cultural organizations that provide exceptional, sustained arts experiences to children, teens and adults throughout Philadelphia’s neighborhoods. The Bartol Foundation supports organizations throughout the City, from large to small, established and emerging. The Foundation made 20 grants of $5,000 each.  Two grants of $7,500 each were made to Philadelphia Dance Company (Philadanco) in recognition of their exceptional dance training and Sister Cities Girlchoir for their Saturday Girlchoir Academy that builds singers and leaders. Two first-time grantees – Rock to the Future and Warrior Writers– add new perspectives to the mix.

“In the current climate, it is especially important that all voices have the chance to be heard,” said Toni Shapiro-Phim, Chair of the Foundation’s Board of Trustees and Director of Programs for Philadelphia Folklore Project. “Arts programs supported by the Bartol Foundation provide opportunities for the establishment of safe spaces in which to create and connect.”

“We are committed to supporting arts in communities that might otherwise be overlooked,” added Beth Feldman Brandt, Executive Director of the Foundation. “Warrior Writers works with veterans to share their stories. Al-Bustan builds bridges among immigrant communities by making art together.  We are grateful to the organizations we support for partnering with us on this shared mission.”

Grants distributed this year also include $15,000 in funds from the Waterman II Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation.

The $5,000 George Bartol Arts Education Award, given annually to an organization that exemplifies the Foundation’s priorities, will be announced in the fall of 2017.

Updated guidelines and applications for the next round of grants will be available in the winter of 2018 on the Foundation’s website at www.bartol.org with an application deadline of May 1, 2018.

For more information, contact Beth Feldman Brandt Executive Director at  256-519-5311 or at bfbrandt@bartol.org

The Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation seeks to foster an environment where arts and culture can flourish. The Foundation provides financial and technical support to non-profit arts and cultural organizations in Philadelphia. Through its grantmaking, professional development programs and arts advocacy, the Foundation works to ensure a vibrant cultural life for all Philadelphia citizens through programs that use art as a catalyst for meaningful communication and connections, strengthening the social fabric of our City’s neighborhoods.

Powering Connections, Annual Report 2016

Annual Report 2016: October 1, 2015-September 03, 2016

How do you connect? Start with those closest to you—those with whom you share common values or a cultural history. Now expand the circle to those who are trying to achieve the same goals: maybe a friend-of-a-friend or someone whose culture or geography overlaps with yours. Then expand the circle again to people who are allies or could be allies if you could make the case for common interests and long-term benefits.

At the Bartol Foundation, the heart of our work lies in connections. We can only achieve our mission through the work of others. We engage with artists and organizations who themselves are connecting to communities and who share a common vision to bring access to meaningful arts experiences. We look beyond the city of Philadelphia to connect our artists and organizations to others nationally to learn and share our own stories. We engage with partners who share our goals even if they don’t work directly in the arts, but can see its value for advancing their own mission. 

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Supporting Teaching Artists (and Their Students) in the Current Climate-You Can Help

grantee-gathering-november

Supporting Teaching Artists (and Their Students) in the Current  Climate—You Can Help

Regardless of your politics, it is clear that this election marks the end of a particularly divisive time and a heightened climate for the people that Bartol grantees serve. Immigrants who fear deportation or detention, people of color, Muslims, women and girls, and those who live in communities that are already traumatized and marginalized, all have new reason to be concerned for their futures.

After hearing from our grantees who are trying to navigate this new reality, we invited our grantees (above) to join us to share what they are experiencing in their classrooms and see how we can all support each other going forward. While the teaching artists and staff who came together have not seen particular acts that threaten the safety of their students, they all feel that there is a pervasive climate of fear, especially for those community members who are immigrants (undocumented and otherwise) who fear that family members may be deported or detained. Many feel that this climate has brought into the open feelings of racism that have long been under the surface.

We all agreed that it is the job of teaching artists and the organizations that support them to be vigilant in maintaining a safe space for all respectful and compassionate dialogue. There was also agreement that making art provides a space in which to process feelings and also take action in whatever way each organization feels aligns with their mission.

As we all process our feelings about what might happen in the next four years, some want to talk about it. Some don’t. The group felt it was important to be mindful of how we influence those we interact with and the risks/benefits of self-disclosure. Our first responsibility is to have our participants feel as though we are a consistent, reliable, trusted teacher to them.

Many of our colleagues offered specific resources to share with each other. Others expressed a recognition that we need to build ties within our communities and also seek opportunities for strength across communities through collaborations and networking.

What You Can Do

In response to the conversation, we decided to create a system for sharing existing resources, which Bartol will post on a shared Google drive. Resources could include:

  • Trauma-informed practices for the classroom
  • Curriculum to engage students in discussion; writing prompts; activities
  • Community resources that focus on immigrant rights; reporting hate crimes; addressing incidents of discrimination and racism.

If you have resources to share or would like access to the shared resources, email us here. You can also:

  • Send ideas for workshops or resources that you would like us to offer this winter or spring and we will do our best to respond as our own resources allow.
  • Reach out directly to your colleagues (and copy us if you would) when you see opportunities to collaborate across communities.
  • Let us know in the future if you want to meet again to discuss specific topics or in a less structured setting with an open agenda.

Onward.

8 Tips to a Strong (Bartol) Proposal – Deadline May 2, 2016!

At the Bartol Foundation, we want to consider your strongest proposal.  After many years and reading many, many proposals, we encourage organizations to use these tips when creating your request.  Note:  You need to have already had a site visit with us in order to apply.

No Need to Preach to the Choir:  At the Bartol Foundation, we understand the importance of arts education, the creative process and community-based programs.  Focus your proposal on your specific needs and goals rather than extensively quoting research on the importance of the arts.

Be Concrete and Specific:  We want to invest in programs that are clear in their goals and their implementation.  Provide us with concrete details that show you have the components of your proposal well planned out.  For example, give us a timeline of activities, the date and the venue of a community performance, and/or include a support letter from your partner school. Make sure to provide a sample curriculum as part of the required attachments for an arts education request.

Define your Terms:  What is a “ten-week residency”?  Once a week for ten weeks?  All-day, every day for ten weeks?  Forty-five minute sessions or three-hour sessions?  The same students every time or different?  Twelve students in a class or 200?  Again, be specific.

But what if I don’t know the details?  We understand that sometimes our deadline doesn’t quite mesh with your planning.  In that case, tell us the process that you will use to make important decisions or to identify your prospective partners or artists.  Tell us about your track record with work similar to what you are proposing.  But more details always result in a stronger proposal.  Sometimes the best thing is to wait until next year if your plans are not fully formed yet.

Don’t Cite Partners without Telling Them.  We expect that you have spoken with any person or organization that you are naming as a potential partner.  Make sure that they are not also applying to the Foundation for a similar or conflicting request.  It’s always good to provide a letter of support that demonstrates a potential partner is on board.

Evaluation can be simple.  We want to know that you have a system for assessing how you are doing and adapting as you go.  This can be as simple as, “We had no enrollment on Mondays.  We asked the parents and found out that Monday was karate day.  We switched the class to Thursdays and now it’s full.”    In any case, please do answer the question about evaluation with one concrete example.

Why now?  We tend to fund about one-half of the proposals we receive.  Often those that receive funding make a compelling case as to why this is something that needs to happen now.  Why does this project or this year’s general operating programs represent an important step for your organization artistically or organizationally?  Many of you have long-range plans.  Tell us (briefly and concretely) how your request will move your plans forward.

You can’t be new and vague.  For organizations that are new to us, or just plain new, convince us that you have the capacity to pull off what you are proposing.  Again, do this by being concrete and specific when describing your program.

A reminder that you cannot apply to the Foundation without a site visit prior to the deadline.  The 2016 deadline for scheduling a site visit has passed  If you missed it,make sure to get on our calendar early next year.

Any questions?  Call or email us.  The lines are open.

 

 

 

 

 

Five Tips for a Successful Site Visit

Drumming at Taller

A friendly reminder – The Bartol Foundation requires that all applicants schedule a site visit with us before they can be considered for funding. Site visits for our May 2, 2106 deadline must be scheduled no later than April 6, 2016. So, what’s in a site visit? Here are five tips to follow

  1. The right activity:  We value process over product so have us out to see the actual teaching and learning or community activities.  It should be as close to what you will be applying for as you can.  So if you are a dance company doing education programs, we should come see the education programs, not a performance.
  2. The right day:  Pick a point where your program is in full swing – usually midway or towards the end of a process.   Steer clear of days that might have low enrollment like a half-day at school or the day after an extended break.
  3. The right time:  We will usually spend about an hour at a site visit so make that hour count.    You might want us to see one program from beginning to end, or parts of a few programs.  We don’t need to see snack time or homework tutoring before the actual program starts.
  4. The right people:  We do our best not to disturb the program by pulling the teaching artist or program leader away from their work.  We can just observe or if you have someone (e.g. Executive or Education Director, principal, program partner) to meet us and give us background that is helpful.
  5. We understand:  As artists and educators ourselves, we understand that things don’t always go absolutely according to plan.  We know this is just one snapshot of your program and are coming to become more familiar with your work and community.

 To check your eligibility and schedule a site visit, click here.  And watch this quick snapchat video of a recent site visit to Taller Puertorriqueño a Bartol grantee.

Looking Back, Moving Forward Annual Report 2015

In its fiscal year 2015 (October 1, 2014-September 03, 2015), the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation supported arts and culture in Philadelphia through grants, programs and advocacy. The Foundation maintained its focus on in-depth arts education and community-based arts programs, while investigating new ways to engage with cultural organizations, artists and the broader community. To learn more, click Annual Report 2015.

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