Power Street Theatre Company is home to a collective of multicultural and multidisciplinary artists.

Bartol Blog

Learn what is happening in the field of arts education and teaching artistry. Past blog posts with links to resources can be found by searching or by clicking on a category below. Check in often as we update our blog and link to local and national resources.

Supporting Teaching Artists (and Their Students) in the Current Climate-You Can Help

grantee-gathering-november

Supporting Teaching Artists (and Their Students) in the Current  Climate—You Can Help

Regardless of your politics, it is clear that this election marks the end of a particularly divisive time and a heightened climate for the people that Bartol grantees serve. Immigrants who fear deportation or detention, people of color, Muslims, women and girls, and those who live in communities that are already traumatized and marginalized, all have new reason to be concerned for their futures.

After hearing from our grantees who are trying to navigate this new reality, we invited our grantees (above) to join us to share what they are experiencing in their classrooms and see how we can all support each other going forward. While the teaching artists and staff who came together have not seen particular acts that threaten the safety of their students, they all feel that there is a pervasive climate of fear, especially for those community members who are immigrants (undocumented and otherwise) who fear that family members may be deported or detained. Many feel that this climate has brought into the open feelings of racism that have long been under the surface.

We all agreed that it is the job of teaching artists and the organizations that support them to be vigilant in maintaining a safe space for all respectful and compassionate dialogue. There was also agreement that making art provides a space in which to process feelings and also take action in whatever way each organization feels aligns with their mission.

As we all process our feelings about what might happen in the next four years, some want to talk about it. Some don’t. The group felt it was important to be mindful of how we influence those we interact with and the risks/benefits of self-disclosure. Our first responsibility is to have our participants feel as though we are a consistent, reliable, trusted teacher to them.

Many of our colleagues offered specific resources to share with each other. Others expressed a recognition that we need to build ties within our communities and also seek opportunities for strength across communities through collaborations and networking.

What You Can Do

In response to the conversation, we decided to create a system for sharing existing resources, which Bartol will post on a shared Google drive. Resources could include:

  • Trauma-informed practices for the classroom
  • Curriculum to engage students in discussion; writing prompts; activities
  • Community resources that focus on immigrant rights; reporting hate crimes; addressing incidents of discrimination and racism.

If you have resources to share or would like access to the shared resources, email us here. You can also:

  • Send ideas for workshops or resources that you would like us to offer this winter or spring and we will do our best to respond as our own resources allow.
  • Reach out directly to your colleagues (and copy us if you would) when you see opportunities to collaborate across communities.
  • Let us know in the future if you want to meet again to discuss specific topics or in a less structured setting with an open agenda.

Onward.

8 Tips to a Strong (Bartol) Proposal – Deadline May 2, 2016!

At the Bartol Foundation, we want to consider your strongest proposal.  After many years and reading many, many proposals, we encourage organizations to use these tips when creating your request.  Note:  You need to have already had a site visit with us in order to apply.

No Need to Preach to the Choir:  At the Bartol Foundation, we understand the importance of arts education, the creative process and community-based programs.  Focus your proposal on your specific needs and goals rather than extensively quoting research on the importance of the arts.

Be Concrete and Specific:  We want to invest in programs that are clear in their goals and their implementation.  Provide us with concrete details that show you have the components of your proposal well planned out.  For example, give us a timeline of activities, the date and the venue of a community performance, and/or include a support letter from your partner school. Make sure to provide a sample curriculum as part of the required attachments for an arts education request.

Define your Terms:  What is a “ten-week residency”?  Once a week for ten weeks?  All-day, every day for ten weeks?  Forty-five minute sessions or three-hour sessions?  The same students every time or different?  Twelve students in a class or 200?  Again, be specific.

But what if I don’t know the details?  We understand that sometimes our deadline doesn’t quite mesh with your planning.  In that case, tell us the process that you will use to make important decisions or to identify your prospective partners or artists.  Tell us about your track record with work similar to what you are proposing.  But more details always result in a stronger proposal.  Sometimes the best thing is to wait until next year if your plans are not fully formed yet.

Don’t Cite Partners without Telling Them.  We expect that you have spoken with any person or organization that you are naming as a potential partner.  Make sure that they are not also applying to the Foundation for a similar or conflicting request.  It’s always good to provide a letter of support that demonstrates a potential partner is on board.

Evaluation can be simple.  We want to know that you have a system for assessing how you are doing and adapting as you go.  This can be as simple as, “We had no enrollment on Mondays.  We asked the parents and found out that Monday was karate day.  We switched the class to Thursdays and now it’s full.”    In any case, please do answer the question about evaluation with one concrete example.

Why now?  We tend to fund about one-half of the proposals we receive.  Often those that receive funding make a compelling case as to why this is something that needs to happen now.  Why does this project or this year’s general operating programs represent an important step for your organization artistically or organizationally?  Many of you have long-range plans.  Tell us (briefly and concretely) how your request will move your plans forward.

You can’t be new and vague.  For organizations that are new to us, or just plain new, convince us that you have the capacity to pull off what you are proposing.  Again, do this by being concrete and specific when describing your program.

A reminder that you cannot apply to the Foundation without a site visit prior to the deadline.  The 2016 deadline for scheduling a site visit has passed  If you missed it,make sure to get on our calendar early next year.

Any questions?  Call or email us.  The lines are open.

 

 

 

 

 

Five Tips for a Successful Site Visit

Drumming at Taller

A friendly reminder – The Bartol Foundation requires that all applicants schedule a site visit with us before they can be considered for funding. Site visits for our May 2, 2106 deadline must be scheduled no later than April 6, 2016. So, what’s in a site visit? Here are five tips to follow

  1. The right activity:  We value process over product so have us out to see the actual teaching and learning or community activities.  It should be as close to what you will be applying for as you can.  So if you are a dance company doing education programs, we should come see the education programs, not a performance.
  2. The right day:  Pick a point where your program is in full swing – usually midway or towards the end of a process.   Steer clear of days that might have low enrollment like a half-day at school or the day after an extended break.
  3. The right time:  We will usually spend about an hour at a site visit so make that hour count.    You might want us to see one program from beginning to end, or parts of a few programs.  We don’t need to see snack time or homework tutoring before the actual program starts.
  4. The right people:  We do our best not to disturb the program by pulling the teaching artist or program leader away from their work.  We can just observe or if you have someone (e.g. Executive or Education Director, principal, program partner) to meet us and give us background that is helpful.
  5. We understand:  As artists and educators ourselves, we understand that things don’t always go absolutely according to plan.  We know this is just one snapshot of your program and are coming to become more familiar with your work and community.

 To check your eligibility and schedule a site visit, click here.  And watch this quick snapchat video of a recent site visit to Taller Puertorriqueño a Bartol grantee.

Looking Back, Moving Forward Annual Report 2015

In its fiscal year 2015 (October 1, 2014-September 03, 2015), the Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation supported arts and culture in Philadelphia through grants, programs and advocacy. The Foundation maintained its focus on in-depth arts education and community-based arts programs, while investigating new ways to engage with cultural organizations, artists and the broader community. To learn more, click Annual Report 2015.