The Story of Destiny | Introducing our New Social Media Coordinator

We are so excited to introduce our new Social Media Coordinator, Destiny Washington. Destiny makes sure we spread the word about Bartol’s opportunities, workshops and resources. She also celebrates our grantees and community members making a difference.

Tell us about how your journey to having your own social media business, Destiny / Design Co.

I am a self-taught artist and designer from Brooklyn, NY, and I really embrace the Do-It-Yourself ethos. Sometimes the art world has barriers to entry, but I never let that stop me from pursuing art and a creative career. I decided to start my own design business in that same emotional space of wanting to forge a path for myself. I love collaborating with others and being a part of and in control of projects that we create together! In addition to graphic and visual design services, I offer social media management to my clients because I believe a cohesive brand/organization’s message includes social media platforms and the language that you use. In non-profits, social media is often an underutilized space, but people want to hear your stories and see your work!

What drew you to working with the Bartol Foundation and how do you think Bartol can make a difference through its social media?

I love working with non-profit and artist organizations because I am an artist myself. I am newer to the Philadelphia area and was very excited to learn about the work that Bartol Foundation does with artists and funding their projects around the city. Being a part of a team at an organization that I believe in is a huge plus and I am very excited about the work we’ve started together. Bartol can make a difference through its social media by building others up and continuing to further our message of helping and supporting teaching artists. We have begun to shine more light on our micro-grantees, and feature other workshops and organizations on our platforms that we believe in and support. Bartol Foundation’s social media has goals of continuing to further our reach as well as strengthening our growing community of teaching artists.

What advice would you give to artists and arts organizations trying to develop their social media presence?

– Quality over Quantity

– Show works in progress (People like to see your process and your inner workings)

– Play around with themes (Ex: Posting only in one color, recurring hashtags)

– Find the balance between personal and professional.

What are the two (or three) apps you can’t live without?

I love Pinterest! My mind has 30+ open tabs on a regular basis, so being able to neatly organize and categorize my thoughts, projects and ideas is a godsend. Although it’s got its share of issues, Instagram is a great app! It has helped me connect with many other creatives, artists and design entrepreneurs I would have never known before. Their inspiration goes a long way for me. Your work on social media can do the same for others. I also really enjoy the Repost App, which makes it very easy to share the work of others you collaborate with or admire! It easily copies the media and text from an Instagram post to your phone for your use. Artists and Organizations can use this to help spread each other’s messages!

And our always favorite question. Best. Snack. Ever.

There’s nothing better than a ripe mango!

 

Destiny Washington is a visual designer based in Philadelphia who focuses on brand identity and social media. Find more about her and her work here.

 

Bartol/Small But Mighty Arts Micro-Grants: Teaching Artistry Meets Community

*Bartol’s 2019 micro-grant application is open online through Sunday, August 25. Learn more about how to apply: https://bartol.org/our-grantees/ta-microgrants/.

 

In early 2018, the Bartol Foundation partnered with Small But Mighty Arts (SBMA) to award micro-grants to teaching artists working on community-based projects. Although it may be called a “micro-grant,” the impact on teaching artists is anything but small! Keep reading to learn more about the TAs who have benefitted from this program.

Throughout 2018, Bartol/SBMA awarded 10 micro-grants totaling $5,000 to teaching artists in a range of artistic disciplines, including creative writing, dance, fabric and textile, film and video, music performance, interactive design, printmaking, and theater, among more. These teaching artists have been working in Philadelphia for an average of 18 years in communities ranging from West Philadelphia to Germantown to South Philadelphia.

Of our 2018 micro-grantees, 30% had never received a grant before. (In fact, this number is unusually low for SBMA’s grantees; typically, around 60% of their grantees are first-time grant recipients.) Around 80% were funding project expenses out of pocket—either with personal savings or money earned from a job—at an average of $483 spent per month for creative expenses. These micro-grants provide important support for teaching artists, making these projects financially feasible.

Micro-grantees have used their awards to fund various project expenses. The majority (70%) have used their grants to pay for supplies and materials, and half have been able to pay for staff support on projects. For artists who are in the middle of a project, the most important resources needed are equipment, space, and online support.

 

To learn more about this program, be sure to check out interviews with some of our past micro-grantees:

Chris Coyle

Alexandra Espinoza

Yinka Orafidiya

Ellen Reynolds

Rose Benson

Misty Sol

Save the Dates! Announcing Bartol’s Winter-Spring 2019 Workshops

You asked and we delivered! Check out the Bartol Foundation’s upcoming workshops. Registration opens 4-6 weeks in advance – sign up for our email newsletter and like us on Facebook and be the first to know when you can register.

 

Books and Words: Bookbinding and Poetry Workshop

Tuesday, January 22, 2019, 9:30am-12pm

Join Candy Alexandra González (a Latinx papermaker, printmaker, book artist and young poet) for this hands-on session for teaching artists who want to incorporate simple bookbinding and poetry writing into their teaching practice. Register here.

 

TA Play Date: Let’s Put on a Show! Theatre in 60 Minutes

Monday, January 28, 2019, 5:30-7:00pm

Led by master teaching artist, Maureen Sweeney and tech teaching artist, Raven Buck, this session will share quick (and cheap) strategies to create a theatre piece in 60 minutes. Register here. 

 

Stop Motion Animation: Creating Community with Animation

Wednesday, February 6, 2019, 5:30pm-8pm

Back by popular demand, media artist Jennie Thwing will lead this workshop focused on simple techniques used to run a community workshop in stop motion animation. Register here.

 

Building your Teaching Artist Pathway

Monday, February 11, 2019, 10am-12pm

In this hands-on, reflective session, you will investigate where you are now in your career and how to intentionally plan for a career for a teaching artist that suits you as an artist and educator. Register here.

 

Marketing: Teaching Artist Statement

Wednesday, February 27, 2019, 9:30am-12pm

Led by Michelle Angela Ortiz, former Program Manager at the Bartol Foundation and experienced Teaching Artist, you will draft a teaching artist statement that reflects your unique point of view and the ‘product’ you will be marketing to your potential audience. Register here.

 

Teaching Artist Play Date: Drumming your Story

Monday, March 11, 2019, 5:30pm-7pm

In this drumming workshop participants will explore the power of musical expression, build community, acquire tools for coping with stress, and be granted permission to create and succeed in a fun and safe space without the pressure being perfect. Register here.

 

Trauma-Informed Practice: Movement as Healing

Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 9:30am-12pm

Teaching artist Shavon Norris will lead us through a fully-participatory workshop to experience how to incorporate movement in your lessons in ways that meet the needs and abilities of your participants. Register here.

 

Marketing Yourself as a Teaching Artist: Creating your Signature Lessons

Wednesday, April 10, 2019, 9:30am-12pm

Led by Michelle Angela Ortiz, former Program Manager at the Bartol Foundation and experienced Teaching Artist, you will choose your signature lesson and learn to communicate clearly your curriculum goals, identify your themes, and select your target audience. Register here.

 

Marketing Yourself as a Teaching Artist: Let’s Talk Money

Tuesday, April 24, 2019, 10am-12pm

This session will work through how to set fair prices for your teaching artist activities, budget for all parts of a project, and develop ‘what if’ scenarios to make budgeting a useful tool in your teaching artist life. Register here.

 

Grassroots Fundraising for Dollars and Engagement

For many community-based organizations, robust individual giving may seem like something only large organizations with wealthy board members can attain. On December 11, 80 grantees of eight foundations joined together to learn from their nonprofit colleagues who shared strategies for community-driven fundraising that brings in both dollars and engagement. Their work was based in practices of community organizing, advocacy and entrepreneurship.

In a panel moderated by Denise Beek of the Leeway Foundation, each presenter shared their strategy for generating income from sources other than foundations. Kirtrina Baxter from Soil Generation Coalition is experimenting with collective funding methods, including service and product fees as a supplement to foundation funding, representing people of color who are often under-resourced. Jonathan Bix from Nobody Leaves Mid-Hudson (New York) built $200,000, 3,000-donor annual grassroots fundraising program in 5 years based on volunteer fundraisers making direct, personalized asks of their networks. Aarati Kasturirangan from the Bread and Roses Community Fund’s The Giving Project trained and supported five, twenty-person cross-race, cross-class groups in personal network-based, direct-ask fundraising resulting in close to $1,000,000 raised from 2100 donors since June 2016. Rapheal Randall at Youth United for Change trained and supported young people who conduct seasonal neighborhood canvassing efforts focused on identifying new supporters and monthly sustainers for community organizing groups.

While each had a different approach, there were some common themes:

  • each initiative involved extensive training to get at underlying issues with talking about or asking for money so that people instead felt that it is powerful and righteous to ask for money that benefits their community;
  • it was important to have leaders from within the communities they were serving, including young people, people of color; and coalitions of people with common interests;
  • conflicts arose and it was important that everyone was accountable and grew together through the process; and,
  • it was a time-consuming process that required keeping an eye on the prize – revisiting the intention as well as the outcome.

After the panel, participants had the opportunity to dig deeply into two of the initiatives, learning more about the nuts and bolts of implementation.  With the help of artist Rodney Camarce, we ended the day with a visual map of the conversation (above) that emphasized the loop of relationships and networks that led to success. 

Thanks to our colleagues who collaborated to provide this free professional development event including the Barra Foundation, Claneil Foundation, Douty Foundation, Seybert Foundation, New Century Trust, Nelson Foundation, Stockton Rush Bartol Foundation and The Philadelphia Foundation.

Are You Covered? Insurance 101 for Teaching Artists – Interview with Holly Fisher

As a teaching artist, you are also your own small business manager. It’s important to think through the responsibilities and liabilities you take on when going into the community to do work—or even in your own studio.

Today on the Bartol blog, we bring you an interview with Holly Fisher. Holly is Program Lead for Insurance and Visas at Fractured Atlas, a New York-based nonprofit that works with artists, arts organizations, and cultural stakeholders nationwide to provide affordable and accessible insurance coverage.

 

What kinds of insurance are most essential for teaching artists?

It varies based on what each individual teaching artist is doing and where they are in their career. The most common type of insurance we see by far is liability insurance, usually with abuse and molestation coverage. Sometimes we’ll have teaching artists request student accident coverage, or inland marine or property insurance for expensive materials or equipments. Workers’ compensation we see a lot, and then there’s volunteer accident coverage if an artist works with volunteers who need to be covered.

When does it make sense for a teaching artist to get insurance?

We don’t, by default, say “yes, you need coverage.” But if you’re working with entities—like granting organizations, the city, schools, or a landlord—that require you to have insurance, obviously that’s a reason to get coverage. It’s going to give you access to more opportunities. Another reason to get coverage is if you are looking to lend credibility to your organization or yourself as a teaching artist. Parents are going to feel more secure, for instance, if you have coverage for abuse and molestation, knowing that you’ve crossed all of your t’s and dotted your i’s. Ask if it financially makes sense for you. Sometimes insurance is expensive, so it doesn’t make financial sense. If it’s going to be super expensive and you don’t really have anyone requiring you to have insurance, it may not yet be the time.

What are some strategies for teaching artists to secure insurance?

With somebody starting out looking for insurance, I would recommend that they first do some research on insurance providers that specialize in the arts and apply to as many as possible. It’s a really good idea to get quotes to compare. I would also say that it’s a good idea to have any insurance requirements or contracts for the coming year at the ready to give to a broker or agent so they can make sure that the artist is really getting the insurance that they need.

What are the specific concerns teaching artists should be aware of when purchasing insurance? What questions should they ask?

If you’re looking at different companies and wondering where to start, a good idea is to make sure that the insurance companies are A-rated by A.M. Best—that just means that they’re reputable companies that are financially secure. And that’s going to be important. It’s something that a lot of different institutions might require. If you’re working with a landlord or with a granting organization, they may want you to have insurance with a reputable company.

Another thing to look for is that the limits of the coverage are going to match what you need for requirements to your landlord or from a grant. For liability insurance, best practice is usually that your policy has a minimum of a million dollars per occurrence and two million dollars aggregate. Something that is less than that is going to be lower than the requirements for a lot of different institutions.

I would also make sure that the artists are going through their third party contracts to see if there are any special requirements. It can be tough if you’re about to start a really cool opportunity and find out that your insurance doesn’t meet a certain tiny little requirement, which would prevent you from getting that grant or working with this school, for instance.

Checking the quote itself is important to see what exclusions are on the policy. That’s something that you definitely want to ask a broker or agent—for example, if there’s a deductible. For most liability policies, that’s not going to be the case, but certainly for an equipment insurance policy, or if you’re covering your materials, that would be something that might come up.

Additional insured coverage is important if you’re working with other entities. If possible, it’s great to get blanket additional insured coverage so that anybody who needs a certificate of insurance or proof of your coverage can get it.

 

To learn more about insurance opportunities for teaching artists, visit https://fracturedatlasinsurance.org.

Interview responses have been edited for length and clarity.